Yoram Yasur Rubin: Pronation and supination of runner’s feet

Yoram Yasur Rubin: Pronation and supination of runner’s feet

Pronation is the movement inward of the foot as it rolls to optimally distribute the force of the impact on the ground as you run. With normal pronation, the foot “rolls” inwardly by about fifteen percent, comes into full contact with the ground, and can support your body weight without any problem. Pronation is critical for the correct absorption of impacts and helps to push uniformly from the front of the foot at the end of the walking cycle.

Yoram Yasur Rubin: Although pronation is a natural movement of the foot, the size of the runner’s arch can affect its ability to roll, causing supination. It is important to find athletic shoes that provide the best support for your bow and pronation tendencies. If you have a normal arch, it is likely to be a normal pronator, which means that it will do better in a stability shoe that offers moderate pronation control. Runners with flat feet often overlap, so a motion control shoe that controls pronation will be better. A neutral cushion shoe that encourages a more natural movement of the foot is recommended.

Overpronation:

As with the “normal pronation” sequence, the outside of the heel makes initial contact with the ground. However, the foot rolls inward more than the ideal fifteen percent, which is called “overpronation.” This means that the foot and ankle have problems stabilizing the body, and the impact is not absorbed efficiently. At the end of the gait cycle, the front of the foot pushes out from the ground using mainly the big toe and the second toe, which then must do all the work.

Prevention of overpronation injuries:

Yoram Yasur Rubin: Overpronation causes additional stress and tightness to the muscles, so do a little extra stretching. Too much foot movement can cause corns, bunions, runner’s knee, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles tendinitis.

If you are an overpronator, here are some tips to help you find the right shoes for your feet:

  • Wear shoes with straight or semi-curved teeth
  • Look for movement or stability control shoes with firmness, multi-density and external control features that limit pronation
  • Use arch supports

The Feet Supination:

It is the insufficient inner roll of the foot after landing. Again, the outside of the heel makes initial contact with the ground. But inward movement of the foot occurs at less than fifteen percent (that is, there is less rolling than in those with normal or flat feet). Consequently, the impact forces are concentrated in a smaller area of the foot (the outer part) and are not distributed efficiently. In the push phase, most of the work is done by the smaller fingers on the outside of the foot.

Yoram Yasur Rubin: This puts additional stress on the foot, which can lead to iliotibial band syndrome, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. The supination will make the outer edge of the running shoes to wear before. To see if your shoes are worn, place them on a flat surface. If you lean out, supination is the culprit. Runners with high arches and tight Achilles tendons tend to be supinator’s.

Injury Prevention by Supination:

Yoram Yasur Rubin: Supinator’s should do additional stretches for the calves, hamstrings, buttocks, and iliotibial band. Wearing the right type of sneakers and replacing worn shoes will also help prevent injuries.

If you are a supinator, here are some tips to help you find the right shoes for your feet:

  • Wear shoes with hard curves to allow pronation
  • Look for light trainers as they allow more movement in the feet
  • Check the flexibility on the medial (inner) side of the shoe